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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be revenues as well. second, he's rejecting the john boehner approach which is boehner saying i'll agree to revenues as long as they come as a result of economic growth. in other words, we won't legislate changes in taxes. we'll hope that revenues go up. he's saying no, that won't work for me. you're not going to legislate spending cuts. this is the president talking. not legislate revenue changes as well. >> bill: all right. so there are -- the most immediate decision maybe facing the congress is that as you point out, all of the bush tax cuts expire. which means not only the taxes -- tax cuts for the wealthy expire, the tax cuts for those making under $250,000 a year expire as well. so the president said friday all right, the senate has already passed a bill which would give extended tax cutless for the 98%, those making under $250,000. but let the ones for the wealthier people and defined as over $250,000 expire. and he challenged the house of representatives to pass that. what do you think -- so this is a real -- to
to figure out the fiscal cliff. is speaker boehner ready to make a deal anytime soon? >>> plus, major news for big business. the justice department hits bp with the biggest criminal penalty ever assessed on a corporation for the 2010 gulf oil spill. >>> and so much for the ideas that twinkies last forever. bankruptcy breaks a big-time baker. >>> good morning from washington. it's friday, november 16, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert in for chuck todd who hasn't worked hard enough at all this entire election campaign, he's now going to asia to cover the president's trip. former cia director david petraeus will testify in the benghazi attacks before the senate intelligence committee. he just wrapped up testifying on the house side. petraeus' questioning comes as he now finds himself under investigation by the agency he once led. acting director michael morell has ordered the inspector general to investigate whether he used agency resources including security details, private jets, and special accommodations to facilitate his affair with paula broadwell. officials say the c
skaur enough votes to implement an austerity budget so now he's back to help john boehner secure enough votes versus the president to press for an austerity budget, is that right? >> yeah, that's correct, martin. it's interesting, there's a lot of criticism saying paul ryan's vision for an american budget was routinely rejected flat out by voters a little more than a week ago. so why will he have such an impact in terms of the fiscal cliff negotiations? and the reason is that paul ryan, despite the presidential loss, continues to be the ideological godfather of the current republican budget -- >> but, luke, he just got ripped to shreds. he just got pulverized in the election. in fact, so many of his ideas, he had to go quiet on because they were so deficient and attacked during the presidential campaign. yet there you are now telling our audience he's back and republicans have him as their -- one of their main stakeholders. >> he's very much still an important player within the house republican conference. so much so that speaker boehner when it came to having a daily meeting about the
and speaker boehner agrees to a rate hike, not just limiting deductions and that sort of thing, what would you think? >>guest: i don't think he will agree to a rate hike. what you are looking at is closing loopholes and limiting deductions and getting revenue from growth combined with entitlement reform and better spending control. >>neil: if it is a rate hike you would not be for that because the president argued earlier this week he doesn't think the numbers are there to get as much from closing loopholes, allowances and the rest than a simple hike in the rate? >>guest: the reality is to get revenue, you need economic growth and by raising rates you hurt economic growth by closing loopholes limiting deductions you make sure that wealthy people pay their fair share. >>neil: you can get a like amount of money from that, senator, than just raising the rate itself? >>guest: that is the real chance to get revenue because you have the kind of tax reform that will stimulate economic growth. if our economy doesn't grow you will not have more revenue even if you raise rates. that combined with spendi
directly at odds with house speaker john boehner. >> could you accept a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? we've seen talk about a possible compromise that could leave rates the same but cap deductions for high-income earners. is that something that's acceptable? >> no. >> not at all no, way? >> no. the preponderance made it very clear in his campaign that there are not enough -- what you just described is a formula and a blueprint for hampering our future. you cannot go forward -- you have to cut some investments. if you cut too many you are hampering growth, you're hampering education, investments for the future. >> and even thousands of miles away it appears president obama is still focused on those negotiations. while touring a royal monastery with secretary of state clinton in thailand the president was overheard mentioning the budget talks to a monk. the president later clarified his comments -- >> he's not any monk. >> no. >> he has some big i vestments in the stock market. >> he later clarified his comments at a news conference. >> yes, we were working on
'll play their hand i think to their full advantage. >> what kind of hand does john boehner have? where sg it leave him and his ability to control the tea party wing? >> it actually puts skron boehner in a good position because during the debt ceiling talks last year, he had a lot of push back from the very far right of his party in the house. the tea party caucus, for example. this time around we won't see the same dynamic at all because the tea party caucus and far right have lost a lot of political capital in light of the election. so what we've already seen is speaker boehner talking to republicans in the house, putting his foot down early and saying we're not going to have that same push back we saw. instead, i'm going to tell you what we're going to do and what this deal is going to look like and you'll fall into line. >> he got criticism because he negotiated a deal and then went back and tried to sell to the party. does he naed to do he need to d way around, get a set position and then go into discussions? >> i think that is the thinking this time around. and he has certainly recog
back and forth. you had boehner's position from the -- >> i don't want to anger the viewers, you but i think they're looking at obama's words the same way they look it at the polls with the kind of sense of here's what i want to believe. >> if they lose, do they go along with that and say we will accept that or do they push it over the fiscal cliff. you have people on the right and the left who are saying go over. >> in the press conference yesterday, my read of what obama said was we're raising the rates and we're put a structure for eliminating entitlements. >> correct. but if we're talking about rates, if you were playing joe, you would hear that the argument would be that this will never actually work. republicans won't go loochialon it. so some people were suggesting maybe there is a way to do 35% and get rid of deductions. >> but remember was it geithner on -- today is thursday. so this would have been tuesday. he said people are diluting themselves to think we can get where we need to get with loopholes. and i don't know about the right max, but my understanding is i don't think
. >>> if the fiscal cliff negotiations seem familiar, we've seen the movie before. president obama and speaker boehner were unable to reach a debt deal in 2001. one of the by-products of the inaction was a downgrade of the country's credit rating. could this happen again? and what would it mean for the nation's financial standing across the globe? joining me is jared bernstein, senior fellow at the center for budget policies and priorities. good to see you again, when it comes to the credit rating, we've seen it happen before. all three credit rating agencies are saying you've got to put a deal together in washington, if you guys in washington don't get it done, we're going to downgrade your credit. >> we've seen this movie before. it's not a good movie. i will remind viewers that the last time standard and poors did take us down a notch, it actually didn't hurt our ability to finance our debt at all. so that was kind of blown off by the markets, but this time could be different. there's one interesting wrinkle here. i do believe that if the political discourse, which is actually sounding a little bet
standing next to john boehner? >> and mitch mcconnell -- >> and mitch mcconnell by the way. right. >> the president is in a different position now. re-elected by a pretty impressive margin than he was the last time he tried to forge a deal that collapsed. >> right. that was the debt ceiling. he had a real problem with that with the grand bargain. he also had after the 2010 midterms when he had a lame duck session of congress and he had to give on keeping the tax cuts for the wealthy. this is a president right now who believes he's got some leverage. he got re-elected. and these are republicans who are trying to figure out just who they are andy ds sun the president's press conference earlier this week, he's somebody who studied the flaws of a e d i make some progress without overreaching. it's very clear they're worried at the white house about doing some overreach here. if he can get a fiscal deal done, that will be very, very important for his legacy in the long-term. and he knows it. >> are the republicans operating from the same game plan? >> no. i think they're not. i mean,
hubbard, what boehner said, and i take from this collection some optimism in 20 # 13 the way it might play out is whether we go over or don't go over the fiscal cliff, you know, there's a lot to happen in the next three months, that we get to some space where if they did a trillion dollars of cuts and reforms to entitlements, a frl on discretionary, a trillion in new revenue, a trillion in saved interest only because the budget doesn't understand net present value, but that's okay, but if you did that, there's a grand bargain in a way that would be, i think, a pretty good accomplishment for both parties. i think that the principle thing in that is is can you gent a significant chunk of republicans in the house to support anything that has a trillion dollars of revenue in it. >> you think they reach a bargain, move quickly over the cliff. what happens to get to the bargain? >> yeah, sorry, i thought that's what you were asking. >> yeah. >> i'm pessimistic they will be able to sort out that bargain in the next two months so i'm afraid there's -- i think a serious danger, they go over the fis
the election, speaker boehner sate said the fight is over and it is i now the law of the land. do these refusals mean the fight may not be over? >> i think the federal government is prepared to run exchanges in the states that don't cooperate. speaker boehner is right, the congress will no longer talk about repealing the law. i think if congress we will see pb cans raising portions of the law they think are controversial or may be able to attract democratic votes and peel back smaller pieces of the health reform law. >> what's your best guess that the the states will adhere to the deadline. mid december ito make their attentions known. >> i think it is important to note the health reform law, people have to select plans beginning in ok of next year and the plans go live in the year following. there's not a lot of time between now and then. states want to run their state exchanges we will know by december which ones are ready and which aren't. >>> ahead, getting to the truth about ben benz. a house member who grilled general petraeus on captiol hill joins us in just a moment. yeah,
with boehner. but might be the beginning of bargain point. but you get 820 billion. so there's another 800 billion. at this point, the others are saying no cuts to medicare, social security, or anything else. and they have to find another 800 billion. >> the president did not say -- >> we know he has to cut some of those. >> my guess is the gop is saying they're looking at a trillion dollars as the number. >> and you saw what paul ryan said. the house was re-elected. so people re-elected those people in the house for a reason. it's a nonstarter. it's not going to happen. it's not going to be 1.6 billion. 1.6 trillion. to get to four trillion, that would be 2.4. so we said that. he'll go not 3-1 like simpson bowles. he's go one and a half to one. >> that's not going to happen either. >> but what bothers me -- >> the problem is nothing is going to happen. >> what bothers me is i do think you can get to a point where you raise taxes too much and you don't cut spending enough, where you're just funding entitlements by raising taxes and you don't do anything about it. if he had his way, i reall
years later, what moment are we in as boehner enters? >> this is a magic moment, i really do. it is a moment when our generation has a chance to do something about this problem that we created. it is our generation that got us into this mess, and we ought to get ourselves out. we got a good chance. you got a second-term democrat president who has come out and said he is willing to put entitlements on the table. big deal. you've got a speaker, a republican speaker, who really gets at, who really understands the depths of the problems we face, and he has come out and said we are going to put revenues on the table. big move. he got at least half the members of the senate already saying they will support a balanced plan, which makes a lot of sense. we have got the business community lined up firmly against -- for doing something smart, and i guess most importantly, we got this fiscal cliff where if we go over it, we are going to face the most predictable economic crisis in history. fortunately for all of us, it is also the most of voidable. this is the magic moment to get somethi
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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